Infant/Toddler Caregiving: A Guide to Culturally Sensitive Care. SUPPORTING MATERIAL: Essential Connections: Ten Keys to Culturally Sensitive Care [Video]

The Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers, WestEd, Center for Child and Family Studies, California Department of Ed., Child Development Division

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Summary:

Summary for a Guide to Culturally Sensitive Care:

This guide is intended to be used in conjunction with the fourth module of the Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers (PITC), a four-module video training course for providers of family and center child care. The videos illustrate key concepts and caregiving techniques for a specific area of care, and the guides provide extensive and in-depth coverage of a topic. This guide focuses on the ways in which caregivers can support the early development of infants and toddlers by becoming sensitive to the vital role in that development of the children's home culture and language. Section One, "The Importance of Culture in Early Development," explores the empowering process of culture, cultural appreciation and enrichment, and practical suggestions for becoming culturally sensitive. Section Two, "Multicultural Issues in Child Care," discusses cultural sensitivity in routine caregiving tasks (such as toilet training and feeding), culture and learning in infancy, and concerns of immigrant families (such as the stress of sudden change and the longing for old family ways). Section Three, "The Process of Culturally Sensitive Care," explores a model for developing culturally responsive caregiving--acknowledge, ask, and adapt; creating an inclusive, nonstereotypical environment for infants and toddlers; and supporting staff relationships in a culturally responsive program. This section also includes several "thinking/doing activities" to put concepts into practice. The last section, "Suggested Resources," lists books, periodicals, organizations, and audiovisuals. Includes an appendix with caregiver-parent information/resources forms. Contains 38 references.

Summary for Essential Connections: Ten Keys to Culturally Sensitive Care [Video]:

Culture is the fundamental building block of identity. Through cultural learning, children gain a feeling of belonging, a sense of personal history, and a security in knowing who they are and where they come from. When young children are cared for by their parents and other family members, the process of cultural learning occurs naturally. When children must be cared for outside the home, it is important that they receive culturally sensitive care. Culturally sensitive care strengthens a child's emerging sense of self and connection with his or her family. This video, with accompanying brochure, recommends ways to structure and run childcare programs for infants and toddlers to strengthen children's connections with their families and home culture. The first five recommendations presented in the video establish a framework for addressing cultural issues. Within that framework, the video's second five recommendations focus on the give and take in the culturally diverse world of infant-toddler care. The 10 recommendations are the following: (a) provide cultural consistency, (b) work toward representative staffing, (c) create small groups, (d) use the home language, (e) make environments relevant, (f) uncover your cultural beliefs, (g) be open to the perspectives of others, (h) seek out cultural and family information, (i) clarify values, and (j) negotiate cultural conflicts. 

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Bibliographic Information:

The Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers, WestEd, Center for Child and Family Studies, California Department of Ed., Child Development Division. Infant/Toddler Caregiving: A Guide to Culturally Sensitive Care. SUPPORTING MATERIAL: Essential Connections: Ten Keys to Culturally Sensitive Care [Video] (1995). California Department of Education: Sacramento, CA. (102 pages).

Sponsoring Agency: Carnegie Corporation of New York

Language: English

Reading Level: Average

Formats Available: Printed Material, Videotape

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Availability:

(Check with the California Department of Education to verify price of PITC materials. PITC videos are available in Spanish, English and Cantonese; accompanying video magazine in English and Spanish; Trainer's Manual Handouts and Transparencies in English and Spanish. Guides English
only at the present time.
 )

California Department of Education
CDE Press
Sales Unit
P.O. Box 271
Sacramento, CA
95812

Phone: (800) 995-4099
Fax: (916) 323-0823

Email: jblack@cde.ca.gov
URL: http://www.pitc.org/

Languages Available: English, Spanish

Summary Biblio Info Availability Producer Info Users' Comments Excerpts

Producer Information:

Intended User Audience:

The Program for Infant/Toddler Caregivers was developed primarily for professional providers working in family child care homes and centers serving children zero-to-three years old. Beginners and individuals with advanced level of experience will find these materials useful.
These materials were developed for a universal population. These materials may be used in a variety of settings including inservice training and college settings. These materials were initially developed for use in the state of California. However, they are being used throughout the United States and its territories.
 

Product Development:

These materials were developed through funding received from the California Department of Education and various private foundations. For more information regarding funding sources, please contact WestEd. The staff of the California Department of Education and WestEd collaboratively developed these materials with the help of practitioners, administrators, and nationally-recognized experts from the field of early education with a focus on children ages zero-to-three years. In addition, film experts assisted in the development of the videos. A California-based professional translator did the Spanish translation of the trainer's manual handouts and transparencies. An early childhood professional and translator did the Chinese (Cantonese) translation of the materials.
 

Product Evaluation:

The developers of these materials are in the process of evaluating the project and the module training institutes. Based on anecdotal reports from users (e.g., practitioners, trainers, and experts), these materials have been highly rated and are well received. The program has also been awarded a Golden Apple award from the National Educational Film Festival.

 

Product Dissemination:

As of 1998, over 150,000 copies of these materials have been distributed and sold in the United States (including its territories), Australia, Israel, Italy, Korea, Mexico, and New Zealand. 

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